Ke:ec

Textile Design

Retailing textile designs to local manufacturers and artisans promotes your brand as a designer and is a good opportunity for collaboration.

Importantly select the best materials and manufacturers possible to increase the benefit of producing independently and maintain a local ethos. Keep in mind careful colour selection for non seasonal collections when designing small runs and seek out unusual fabrications.

Things to consider when manufacturing locally are price and minimums and if you prefer your label to evolve on-shore or towards mass market levels of production or to on-sell. 

Featured is a collaboration of my textile design’s with industrial designer Ke:ec. Hand drawn textile design’s silkscreen printed onto a cotton drill base cloth and manufactured by Ke:ec into satchel bags. The products were retailed in a shop called Bamakko in Melbourne and online. The product was sourced, designed and made locally. 

Ke:ec Satchel in charcoal & silver. Textile Designer, Orchis Morio (2009)

Orchis Morio

Graphic Design

After learning the art of silkscreen printmaking in Glasgow and graduating from Fine Art, I rented a studio space in the Nicholas Building in Melbourne and started my own textile design label called Orchis Morio.

I designed textile print repeats from ink pen drawings and sourced a local manufacturer to silkscreen print the designs onto fabrics. The fabrics were retailed by the metre to local artisans for accessories and homewares products, as well I designed my own homewares products.

Inspired by the art nouveau and Mackintosh architectural nature of the Glasgow cityscape, I designed a logotype for the label. Orchis Morio is the green-winged orchid and was chosen because of the organic and unusual form of the orchid flower. The flower is part of the orchidaceae family and has purple flowers, often located in Europe and the Middle East. The logo motif was drawn based on the flower and the logotype letters were original typeface designs developed in illustrator, referencing the Glasgow style. 

From a design perspective it’s important to have a unique brand ethos to begin with, as this can be the blueprint to refine and rebrand later on. 

Orchis Morio logo. Graphic Designer, Lisa Engelhardt (2008)